limmynem:

Incredibly beautiful capture of a frozen statue by photographer Miika Järvinen

limmynem:

Incredibly beautiful capture of a frozen statue by photographer Miika Järvinen

2headedsnake:


0rchid-thief.livejournal.com
Escher - Encounter 1944

2headedsnake:

0rchid-thief.livejournal.com

Escher - Encounter 1944

3rdofmay:

The art: Christian Boltanski, The Storehouse, 1988.
The news: “The Hell of Victory,” by Ian Buruma in The New York Review of Books. Buruma’s essay is a review of Ben Shephard’s new book, “The Long Road Home: The Aftermath of the Second World War.”
The source: Collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York. 
Nota bene: MoMA’s description of the work: Enlarged photographs of seven young girls are propped atop a stack of unlabeled tin biscuit boxes containing scraps of fabric. These boxes are corroded as if marked by time and are infused with symbolic associations — they evoke reliquary boxes, archival containers, and funerary urns. The black-and-white photographs connote another era; out of focus, they constitute a visual analogy to memory, fading over time. Electric lights illuminate the seven faces like devotional candles, underscoring the effect of a memorial, an orchestration of signifiers indicating loss and remembrance. Old photographs, the tension between individuality and sameness, and the implication of vast numbers evoke the tragedy of the Holocaust.
However, the girls pictured are not victims of genocide: the photographs, of anonymous children, were culled from magazines and newspapers. The boxes are not truly old, and the cloth contained in them is generic and has no special origin. Boltanski creates an atmosphere of general, unspecified mourning through means —photographs, relics — traditionally valued for their privileged claim to specificity, uniqueness, and authenticity. A vocabulary of documentary signs is used movingly, but deceptively, for symbolic effect.

3rdofmay:

The art: Christian Boltanski, The Storehouse, 1988.

The news: “The Hell of Victory,” by Ian Buruma in The New York Review of Books. Buruma’s essay is a review of Ben Shephard’s new book, “The Long Road Home: The Aftermath of the Second World War.”

The source: Collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York. 

Nota bene: MoMA’s description of the work: Enlarged photographs of seven young girls are propped atop a stack of unlabeled tin biscuit boxes containing scraps of fabric. These boxes are corroded as if marked by time and are infused with symbolic associations — they evoke reliquary boxes, archival containers, and funerary urns. The black-and-white photographs connote another era; out of focus, they constitute a visual analogy to memory, fading over time. Electric lights illuminate the seven faces like devotional candles, underscoring the effect of a memorial, an orchestration of signifiers indicating loss and remembrance. Old photographs, the tension between individuality and sameness, and the implication of vast numbers evoke the tragedy of the Holocaust.

However, the girls pictured are not victims of genocide: the photographs, of anonymous children, were culled from magazines and newspapers. The boxes are not truly old, and the cloth contained in them is generic and has no special origin. Boltanski creates an atmosphere of general, unspecified mourning through means —photographs, relics — traditionally valued for their privileged claim to specificity, uniqueness, and authenticity. A vocabulary of documentary signs is used movingly, but deceptively, for symbolic effect.

nevver:

Free Cabin Porn
nevver:

Recollected Memories, Jackson Patterson

nevver:

Recollected Memories, Jackson Patterson


Guillaume Baurand

medformat:
I NEED THIS!!!!
male73:

(via Yanko Design » Key Control)

I NEED THIS!!!!

male73:

(via Yanko Design » Key Control)

So incredible
nevver:

Matt Wisniewski

So incredible

nevver:

Matt Wisniewski

Interesting read

infoneer-pulse:

Monkey brains grow bigger with every cagemate they acquire, according to a new study showing that certain parts of the brain associated with processing social information expand in response to more complex social information.

“Interestingly, there are a couple of studies in humans by different research groups that show some correlation between brain size and the size of the social network, and we found some similarities in our studies,” study researcher Jerome Sallet, of Oxford University in the U.K., told LiveScience.

“[Our study] reinforces the idea that the human social network was built on something that was already there in the rhesus macaques.”

» via Live Science

nprfreshair:

If you’ve ever wondered how structural engineers account for wind speed when designing skyscrapers…(or how toilet waste gets down from the 100th floor of a building)….today’s discussion about the world’s tallest buildings should be of interest.

nprfreshair:

If you’ve ever wondered how structural engineers account for wind speed when designing skyscrapers…(or how toilet waste gets down from the 100th floor of a building)….today’s discussion about the world’s tallest buildings should be of interest.